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井冈山市注射丰下巴费用安专家

2018年12月15日 06:56:54 | 作者:健知识 | 来源:新华社
THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. Today, Laura and I are in Latin America, where we are visiting five countries: Brazil, Uruguay, Colombia, Guatemala, and Mexico. These countries are part of a region that has made great strides toward freedom and prosperity in the past three decades. They have raised up new democracies. And they have undertaken fiscal policies that have brought stability to their economies. Yet despite the progress we have seen, many citizens in our hemisphere remain trapped in poverty and shut off from the promise of this new century. Nearly one out of every four people in Latin America lives on less than a day. Many children never finish grade school. Many mothers never see a doctor. The fact is that tens of millions of our brothers and sisters to the South have yet to see improvements in their daily lives. And this has led some to question the value of democracy. Our Nation has a vital interest in helping the young democracies in our neighborhood succeed. When our neighbors prosper, they create more vibrant markets for our goods and services. When our neighbors have a hopeful future in their own countries, they can find work at home and are less likely to migrate to our country illegally. And when our neighbors feel the blessings of liberty in their daily lives, the appeal of radicalism declines, and our hemisphere becomes more secure. The ed States is doing its part to help our neighbors in Latin America build a better life for themselves and their families. We are helping these young democracies make their governments more fair, effective, and transparent. We are supporting their efforts to meet the basic needs of their citizens -- like education, health care, and housing. And we are increasing opportunity for all by relieving debt, opening up trade, and encouraging reforms that will build market economies, where people can start from nothing and rise as far as their talents and hard work can take them. On Monday, I will meet a Guatemalan citizen who has experienced the power of open trade and free economies. His name is Mariano Can . Twenty years ago, he was an indigenous farmer whose land provided barely enough corn and beans to feed his family. No one in his family had ever been to college, and most of the people in his village never got past the sixth grade. And his own children's prospects for prosperity looked just as bleak. Mariano was determined to do better for his family. So he organized an association of small farmers called Labradores Mayas. He persuaded his fellow farmers to switch their crops to vegetables they could sell overseas -- high-value crops like lettuce, carrots, and celery. Soon they were selling to big companies like Wal-Mart Central America. Today, the business he helped establish is thriving, and it supports more than a thousand jobs. It also has supported something else: a college education for Mariano's son. Mariano is showing what the people of Latin America can accomplish when they are given a chance. We must help others like him gain the opportunity to build a better life for their families. The generosity of the American people is helping our neighbors in Latin America build free and vibrant economies. By doing so, we will increase living standards for all our citizens, strengthen democracy in our hemisphere, and advance the cause of peace. Thank you for listening. 200801/23695President Bush Discusses Free Trade with Western Hemisphere Leaders THE PRESIDENT: Listen, thank you all very much for being here. I'm joined by leaders throughout our hemisphere to discuss trade and prosperity. I know they're going to want to hear about the rescue plan that we have submitted to the Congress. They can see our legislative process is full of give-and-take, that there's ample debate, but I am confident that when it's all said and done, there will be a robust plan. And there needs to be.Each of the 11 countries here has a free trade agreement with the ed States, or one pending before Congress. Free and fair trade is in our mutual interests.What's interesting about free and fair trade amongst the nations is that the people benefit. For example, the Central American-Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement is in its early stages, but trade between participating countries with the ed States is up 23 percent. That translates to jobs and prosperity. In the five years since the free trade agreement between the ed States and Chile took effect, trade between our two nations has increased by more than 180 percent. And that's positive. In other words, these agreements are mutually benefit. And most importantly, they help small business owners and workers and farmers and ranchers.In the nearly 15 years since NAFTA entered into force, trade between the ed States, Canada and Mexico has increased by a combined total of more than 200 percent.Today our countries are launching the Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas Initiative to continue this progress. This initiative will provide a forum where leaders can work to ensure that the benefits of trade are broadly shared. It will deepen the connections among regional markets. It will expand our cooperation on development issues. This is a very promising initiative, and I expect positive results when our representatives meet on these issues later this year.It's important for the American people to understand that exports benefit workers. Half of our growth last year was the result of trade. And therefore, it's in our interest to continue to open up markets, particularly in our own neighborhood. There are three free trade agreements pending in the Congress today: South Korea, Panama and Colombia. Obviously, two of those are with nations in our own hemisphere. The Colombia free trade agreement will be good for Colombia; it will be good for America. The President and I have worked diligently to make sure this is a fair agreement, and Congress needs to pass it.The Panamanian agreement is good for Panama, it's good for America, and Congress ought to pass that agreement, too. It's important that these agreements be passed as soon as possible.I want to thank the leaders for joining us. I'm looking forward to our discussion. I appreciate your hard work in working to make sure your people and your countries have great opportunities. One such opportunity is access to jobs provided by markets.Thank you for your vision, and thank you for your leadership. Thank you.200809/50523Friday 12 May - Strategic Direction of Government You may have heard me and my colleagues talking over the last few days about the need to keep focussed on the long-term - warning of the need not to get blown about by day to day events. In Government there will always be up and downs and I'm sure there will be plenty more. The downs, in particular, make up the daily headlines in the news. But what's important is to stay focussed on what really matters, on the fundamentals - on economy and jobs, welfare reform, on health, education, crime and transport. On long-term change necessary to deliver opportunity and security for the many, not the few. I'm the first to admit we have got a great deal more to do. But by concentrating on these fundamentals, I believe we've been able to make more progress than anyone would have thought possible two or three years ago. The overall goal is clear. It's to build a Britain that is strong modern, and fair. It's an ambitious task. Of course will take time. And it can't be done without change, without hard choices, keeping our eye firmly on the long-term. Because unless something works for the long term, it doesn't really work at all. Tough decisions like giving the Bank of England independence or keeping a tight control of public spending in our first two years which meant saying no as well as yes to a lot of spending plans made to us. But the result today is a Britain with a strong economy where inflation is lower for longer than for decades, public borrowing has been cut by pound;40 billion and as a result of the stability of the economy, nearly 900,000 more people in work than three years ago. Tough decisions like making work pay ensuring we offer more than just a benefit cheque to those out of work. So we have brought in the minimum wage, the Working Families Tax Credit and the New Deal which has helped cut youth unemployment aly by 70%. Tough decisions on pensioners as well. And I know that many people are angry at what they say is simply the 75p rise in the basic state pension. And of course we could have taken the opportunity to put all the money into the basic state pension and win some short-term popularity. But it would have been the wrong decision. Because had we given the pension rise across the board the same for everyone, no matter what they had been given it would have gone exactly the same way to better off and poorer pensioners alike. But the poorest pensioners would hardly have seen a penny of this because their other benefits would have gone down as their basic state pension rose. So what we've done and done deliberately, is to target help first on those poorest pensioners in a way which delivers the most help to those who need it most. So for example the pound;150 winter allowance and the free TV licences for those aged over 75. They have been introduced in a way which means they're not affected by other benefits that people have. And for those above the benefit levels, there's an increase in capital limits and the 10p tax rate. And of course for the very poorest pensioners the new minimum income guarantee means that for a million pensioners, those who are the very poorest pensioners they will get income rises and have got income rises of in some cases up to pound;15 or pound;20 a week. The package together adds up to pound;6.5 billion - that is more than if we uprated the basic pension in line with earnings. So we made some tough choices but we made them from the right values - fairness, helping those that need it most. We have made tough choices too on Education. We need far more investment in education, and we're doing it. An extra investment of an extra pound;300 per pupil over the three years up to 2001. But it's investment tied to reform. Reform of course hasn't always been popular. There was opposition to the literacy and numeracy hour, for example. There's opposition now to reforming pay so teachers can earn extra money without having to leave the classroom for management roles in schools. But as a result of these reforms we are seeing standards improve. The eleven year olds' results for literacy and numeracy were the best ever. The new specialist schools are raising their results quicker than any other schools in the country. So we've taken the long-term view, we've made our reforms and we're going to stick to our guns with them. And it's the same on the health service. We've had to put in place the right strategy for the long-term heath of the National Health Service - backed by the biggest ever sustained increase in funding the Health Service has seen. Not just for one year as used to happen in the past, but now for the next four years we know that the Health Service is going to get the money that we need. And this aly means that we are getting more doctors and nurses into our hospitals. More are now being trained. There are thirty eight new hospitals being built in England alone. Over the next few weeks, we are going to be drawing up the plan to ensure that every penny of the extra investment goes to the Health Service in a way that really brings about a decent improvement in health care. And this plan, the first of it's kind, is not just about spending money, but allying it with change and reform and will I believe deliver a step change in patient care to match our step change in investment and resources. So I know, of course, there are frustrations at the speed of progress, at how much hasn't been done for years, over how much remains to be done. But in fact an immense amount has been done aly, it's just we have a lot more to do. But I've not come across many people who say we are wrong in what we are doing, or disagree with the big decisions we've made or believe we are taking the country in the wrong direction. They agree with us on the destination, they simply want us to get there faster. And so do I. But to get there faster means doing it for the long term. For there's no use doing it fast if it can't be sustained. So on Monday. Gordon Brown will set out how we meet the goal of abolishing child poverty in 20 years. By the end of this month aly one million children will have been lifted out of poverty. On Tuesday at the Confederation for British Industry, I'll set out how we will meet the goal of delivering stability and prosperity for people in a world of rapid economic and technological change. On Wednesday at the Police Federation conference, Jack Straw, the Home Secretary will set out how we take forward the next phase of our programme to tackle crime. So we're going to keep concentrating on what needs to be done to strengthen our economy and our society to deliver opportunity and security for all. Britain's always worked well for the top ten per cent. Our task is and remains to make the changes necessary to make it work for all our people. 200705/13858

President Bush Meets with Bicameral and Bipartisan Members of Congress to Discuss Economy THE PRESIDENT: I want to thank the leaders of the House and the Senate for coming. I appreciate our presidential candidates for being here, as well.We are in a serious economic crisis in the country if we don't pass a piece of legislation. I want to thank the spirit of bipartisan cooperation that's taking place here in Washington. One thing the American people have to know is that all of us around the table take this issue very seriously and we know we've got to get something done as quickly as possible. And this meeting is an attempt to move the process forward. My hope is that we can reach an agreement very shortly.I want to thank the Secretary of the Treasury for working hard with the members. I thank the members for working long hours like they've been doing to come up with a solution that's bipartisan and that will solve the problem.Thank you very much.200809/50526

gT(nmwREo+6IIId*rk8w#OKKmE3This is the place where the Peace Corps was started.LC8IkxqbjnSWhMOiBIt is inspiring to see how all of you, while you are in this country, are trying so hard to live at the level of the people.X7hap;(H8eQDTr0Ru^A second place where we begin to build the Great Society is in our countryside. We have always prided ourselves on being not only America the strong and America the free, but America the beautiful. Today that beauty is in danger. The water we drink, the food we eat, the very air that we breathe, are threatened with pollution. Our parks are overcrowded, our seashores overburdened. Green fields and dense forests are disappearing.SL8Xm1),v-NByA few years ago we were greatly concerned about the ;Ugly American.; Today we must act to prevent an ugly America.bOuN(u(jEinf3lW_5+up2#aMDav1qd+A2UFj4wcAvaIX;ek4*Xod164963

Remarks of President Barack Obama As Prepared for Delivery Weekly AddressJanuary 9, 2010A year ago, when I took office in the midst of the worst recession since the Great Depression, I promised you two things. The first was that there would be better days ahead. And the second was that the road to recovery would be long, and sometimes bumpy.That was brought home again yesterday. We learned that in November, our economy saw its first month of job gains in nearly two years – but last month, we lost more than we gained. Now, we know that no single month makes a trend, and job losses for the final quarter of were one-tenth what they were in the first quarter. But until we see a trend of good, sustainable job creation, we will be relentless in our efforts to put America back to work.That task goes even deeper than replacing the seven million jobs that have been lost over the past two years. We need to rebuild our economy in such a way that our families can feel a measure of security again. Too many of the folks I’ve talked with this year, and whose stories I in letters at night, tell me that they’ve known their own private recessions since long before economists declared one – and they’ll still feel the recession long after economists have declared it over.That’s because, for decades, Washington avoided doing what was right in favor of doing what was easy. And the result was an economy where some made out well, but the middle class too often took a beating.Over the past decade, the income of the average household actually declined, and we lost as many jobs as we created. Hardworking folks who did everything right suddenly found themselves forced to downscale their dreams because of economic factors beyond their control. We’re talking about simple dreams. American dreams. A good job with a good wage. A secure and dignified retirement. Stable health care so you don’t go broke just because you get sick. The chance to give our kids a better shot than we got.That’s why, as we begin to emerge from this crisis, we will not return to the complacency that helped cause it. Even as we focus on putting America back to work today, we’re building a new foundation for our economy to create the good, lasting jobs and shared prosperity of tomorrow.We’re making historic investments in science and in a clean energy economy that will generate and keep the jobs and industries of the future right here in America.We’re reforming our education system, so that our kids are fully prepared to compete with workers anywhere in the world and win the race for the 21st century.We’re fixing our broken health insurance system that’s crushing families, eating away at workers’ take-home pay, and nailing small businesses with double-digit premium increases.And that’s what I’d like to focus on for a minute. After a long and thorough debate, we are on the verge of passing health insurance reform that will finally offer Americans the security of knowing they’ll have quality, affordable health care whether they lose their job, change jobs, move, or get sick. The worst practices of the insurance industry will be banned forever. And costs will finally come down for families, businesses, and our government.Now, it’ll take a few years to fully implement these reforms in a responsible way. But what every American should know is that once I sign health insurance reform into law, there are dozens of protections and benefits that will take effect this year.Uninsured Americans with a pre-existing illness or condition will finally be able to purchase coverage they can afford.Children with pre-existing conditions will no longer be refused coverage, and young adults will be able to stay on their parents’ policy until they’re 26 or 27 years old.Small business owners who can’t afford to cover their employees will be immediately offered tax credits to purchase coverage.Early retirees who receive coverage from their employers will see their coverage protected and their premiums go down.Seniors who fall into the coverage gap known as the donut hole will receive discounts of up to 50 percent on their prescriptions as we begin to close that gap altogether.And every patient’s choice of doctor will be protected, along with access to emergency care.Here’s what else will happen within the first year. Insurance plans will be required to offer free preventive care to their customers – so that we can start catching preventable illnesses and diseases on the front end. They’ll no longer be allowed to impose restrictive annual limits on the amount of coverage you receive or lifetime limits on the amount of benefits you receive. They’ll be prohibited from dropping your coverage when you get sick and need it most. And there will be a new, independent appeals process for anyone who feels they were unfairly denied a claim by their insurance company.In short, once I sign health insurance reform into law, doctors and patients will have more control over their health care decisions, and insurance company bureaucrats will have less. All told, these changes represent the most sweeping reforms and toughest restrictions on insurance companies that this country has ever known. That’s how we’ll make 2010 a healthier and more secure year for every American – for those who have health insurance, and those who don’t.We enter a new decade, now, with new perils – but we’re going to meet them. It’s also a time of tremendous promise – and we’re going to seize it. We will rebuild the American Dream for our middle class and put the American economy on a stronger footing for the future. And this year, I am as hopeful and as confident as ever that we’re going to rise to this moment the same way that generations of Americans always have: as one nation, and one people. Thanks for listening.201001/94199

And now— now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control. Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty —the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace.There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace. General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate. Mr. Gorbachev—Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall! I understand the fear of war and the pain of division that afflict this continent, and I pledge to you my country's efforts to help overcome these burdens. To be sure, we in the West must resist Soviet expansion. So, we must maintain defenses of unassailable strength. Yet we seek peace; so we must strive to reduce arms on both sides. 201111/159996

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